The Agony of Arts & Laughs

Part-time Arts & Laughs host Steve Patrick Adams illustrates what a poser he is using illustrations.

Part-time Arts & Laughs host Steve Patrick Adams illustrates what a poser he is using illustrations.

The Brunch Club's Arts & Laughs, the 2nd Best Stand-Up Night in Montreal as voted by the readers of CULT MTL, is back for its second season Wednesdays at Turbo Haüs

Although we produce the show every week and thus are subject to certain biases, we are extremely proud of the show's format because, more often than not, what's seen in an Arts & Laughs won't be seen anywhere else. Every Wednesday has a different theme attached to it and the performers are tasked with creating a piece (or pieces) of art that relates to the theme, which typically also results in a set or a story that won't be repeated elsewhere. 

Creating a one-and-done stand-up set, as well as some artwork to accompany it, is a lot to ask of unpaid comedians, but they always come through presumably because they care about you, the audience.

To commemorate all the hard work of the comedians that have seen their week-long efforts evaporate into thin air minutes after their set concludes, here now is the agony of Arts & Laughs.

Step 1: The Theme.

Brunch Club head-honcho Sasha Manoli announces the theme to the comedians via Facebook Messenger. Pleasantries are exchanged between the comedians.

"This is going to be fun!" they exclaim belying their true feelings of "What the fuck, Sasha?"

Step 2: Denial.

The Wednesday in which the comedian is supposed to do Arts & Laughs seems so very far away. Preparing jokes, stories and an art piece slides to the very bottom on their list of priorities. In the rare moments that the comedian does contemplate their set, their thoughts are limited to ego-boosting self-deceptions such as "I know what Beginnings is" or "Suspense? I'm the Alfred Hitchcock of suspense."

The comedian's artistic ability also becomes greatly exaggerated in their own mind to reassure them that they are doing the right thing by procrastinating. "I drew something once and mom totally thought it was awesome."

Step 3: Anger.

OH CRAP! 
The comedian's spot is this Wednesday, not next Wednesday!
The comedian sharpens coloured pencils, angrily.
The comedian googles that week's theme, angrily.
The comedian curses Sasha Manoli's name under their breath, angrily. 

Step 4: SHOWTIME!

Wednesday, 7pm has arrived. The comedian watches as host Steve Patrick Adams / Jacob Greco explains the format of the show to the audience and introduces this week's theme. The comedian is filled with self-doubt--"My art sucks. All my pop culture references are from 2009. This is going to be terrible."

The comedian gets brought up on stage. The audience pauses from making their own art pieces with the craft supplies provided by the Brunch Club that could win them a free beer at the end of the show. They howl with laughter at how the comedian managed to relate this week's theme into a 10-minute set that is a perfect balance between funny anecdotes and punchy one-liners. Raucous applause.  

Step 5: The Come Down.

"Wow. That went pretty well. I wonder if there's a way to make ten minutes of jokes about "Repair" seem normal in another context..."

There isn't. But God love you for trying. 

WEDNESDAYS. 7PM. TURBO HAÜS. 5011 rue Notre-Dame Ouest. See you there.

WEDNESDAYS. 7PM. TURBO HAÜS. 5011 rue Notre-Dame Ouest. See you there.